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20130106
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. >> syria? >> yes, syria. >> thanks, jay. after theyve all seen president assad delusional speech on sunday, and today u.n. envoy brahimi actually for the first time he said that its a lost opportunity and there is no political process after this speech. so it seems that after two months, things look even worse than ever before. whats your step forward from this point? >> well, ill say a few things. the speech by bashar al-assad was, indeed, evidence of how delusional he is. the proposal he made was nothing more than a desperate attempt to cling to power, and it would only allow the regime to continue its oppression and killing of the syrian people. the momentum in syria is with opposition forces and with the syrian people. it is clear that as defections continue -- and weve seen a number of them -- and the regime continues to lose control of territory, that assad cannot restore his control of syria. the future in syria does not and will not include bashar al-assad. he has lost all legitimacy, as we have said, and he must step aside to enable a political solution that ends the bloodshed and
is the situation right now in regards to syria's nuclear weapons? does assad have the intention to use those weapons? do you think the visit to the pentagon is to discuss the this topic, this issue? >> the secretary panetta and him have met on a number of occasions. i'm sure the talk of syria will come up. to your question on chemical weapons, without get together deep in intelligence i'm unaware of any information that the syrians are planning to use the chemical weapons. let me be very clear, this government would view that kind of actions a a red line. officials have been clear about that. we will continue to do so. the assad regime and it continues to perpetrate violence against its own people, it is unacceptable and it is time for the assad regime to go. but in the meantime, they have a serious responsibility to maintain security over their chemical weapons and not to use them. >> so you believe that the syrian chemical weapons are in good hands, are safe so far? >> the syrian regime has an obligation to maintain security over the syrian chemical weapons stockpiles. i have not heard of
to be focused on, assuming bashar al-assad comes down, i think there is a likelihood that could happen, how do we concern -- what do we do to deal with that situation? that is a discussion we are having, not only with the israelis but other countries in the region, to try to look at what steps need to be taken in order to make sure these things are secured and they do not wind up in the wrong hands. i think the greater concern right now, what steps does the international community take to make sure that when assad comes down, there is a process to make sure we can secure them. that is the bigger challenge right now. we're not talking about ground troops but it depends on what happens in a transition period is very it -- they're a permissive atmosphere? that will tell you a lot. >> we have talked about the czech republic being eager to train the rebels in another country. is that is something you looked at? >> and have a very capable -- we would call it a nuclear element, capability. built over time in collaboration with us. we are in contact with partners who have that capability. we have done
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3